5 Amazing Benefits of Botox® Injections

 

We love Botox here at Jolie Vie Aesthetics! It truly has some great benefits and our patients love it, too! 🙂

We wanted to share these five amazing benefits with you! We came across it on the International Association for Physicians in Aesthetic Medicine website here.

According to the American Society of Plastic Surgeons, the #1 most common cosmetic complaint patients have is wrinkles. Approved for wrinkle treatment in 2002 and more recently for crow’s feet by the FDA, nothing smooths out wrinkles quicker than Botox Cosmetic®. Your aesthetic patients already know this. Your medical patients, on the other hand, may be skeptical if it is suggested as a treatment for their condition. Here are 5 of the most popular cosmetic and medical benefits of Botox® injections. Use this as a quick and easy way to explain these procedures to your patients.

First, Explain How Botox® Works

The best way to explain Botox® to your patients is this: “Botox® works as a shield between the brain and the muscle so that, even if your brain is telling a muscle to move–whether this is on purpose or because of misfiring neurons–the muscle will stay still.”

Next, outline some of the ways that relaxing muscles can help in both cosmetic and medical patients. Here are some good examples to use.

Botox Benefit #1: Treat a Drooping Brow

Also called “Brow Ptosis,” drooping brow can cause patients to look unhappy and tired even when they are feeling awake and happy. In some instances there are biological reasons for the droop and you might advise your patients to eat more vegetables, exercise their facial muscles, etc. Many times, however, intervention is needed. Administering Botox® results in the relaxing of the brow muscles and, when administered correctly, can keep them aloft.

Botox Benefit #2: Stop Excessive Sweating

“Hyperhidrosis” is defined by the National Library of Medicine as “a medical condition in which a person sweats excessively and unpredictably. People with hyperhidrosis may sweat even when the temperature is cool or when they are at rest.” Your patients probably won’t care about this. They’ll likely just want to stop sweating so much.

Explain that, just like Botox® can prevent directions given by the brain from reaching the intended muscle, it can also act as a shield for sweat glands. It is particularly helpful for excessive localized sweating in the patient’s armpits, feet or hands. Make sure to tell them that they’ll need to repeat the procedure every few months but the smart money says they’ll choose the treatment over the skin conditions they risk developing from having to walk around in damp clothing and shoes all day.

Botox Benefit #3: Reduce Migraine Pain

Many of your practice’s migraine patients will have probably read up on the use of Botox® as a treatment for their condition. This means that you won’t have to do much convincing with them, but you will have to manage expectations. Many migraine sufferers make the mistake of thinking that the drug stops the migraine itself. It doesn’t. It will, however, reduce many of their major symptoms like sensitivity to light and nausea, making the migraine easier to deal with.

Botox Benefit #4: Treatment for Bells Palsy

You have two choices for administering Botox® to your Bells Palsy patients. Here is how you can explain each of those choices to your patients:

Administering the treatment to the paralyzed side of the patient’s face–this can help relax facial muscles that might have tightened up and become painful as well as preventing unwanted facial tics.

Administering the treatment to the non-paralyzed side of the patient’s face–this Botox® benefit is more cosmetic in nature. This technique can help relax the movements on the dominant side of the face. This helps give the face a more balanced look even when the patient is talking or moving their face a lot.

Botox Benefit #5: Stop Eye Twitch/Squinting

If your patient is willing to come into your practice over an eye twitch, it’s safe to think that the twitch is more than a temporary annoyance. Sometimes the twitching will be rapid and/or constant. Other times the twitch can cause a permanent spasm of the muscle, holding it in a tense position for a prolonged period of time. In addition to being annoying and sometimes painful, these twitches can also interfere with the patient’s vision.

A simple explanation of how Botox® works (covered above) is often all you need here.

Talk About Side Effects

The IAPAM’s list of common and uncommon side effects of Botox® physicians need to be aware of include: headache, facial pain, and pain at the injection site (common) as well as temporary eyelid droop, respiratory infection, and muscle weakness (uncommon).

The IAPAM also tells its members that the best way to prevent these side effects is to have a thorough knowledge of the facial muscles and their behaviors, to err on the side of caution, and to practice and master the basics before administering any procedures.

This is where all the time you spent perfecting your bedside manner will come in handy. Talk over side effect fears with each patient and, if necessary, demonstrate your knowledge and skill with the procedure with saline and an inanimate test subject. For some patients, the knowledge that your hands are steady will go a long way!

Knowing how to teach your patients about the benefits of Botox® will help alleviate their fears and preconceived ideas (thanks, Internet!) about what the treatment is for, how it works, and how it is administered. Hopefully, what we’ve shared here will help you do exactly that.

10 Amazing Facts About Your Skin

 

At Jolie Vie Aesthetics, our primary focus is helping YOU and you and your SKIN!

We came across this article on EverydayHealth.com and wanted to share it! The skin is an amazing thing!

Here are 10 things about the skin you live in that may surprise you:

1. Skin is the largest organ in the body. “Skin occupies approximately 1.73 square meters [or more than 18.5 square feet] to cover our flesh and bones,” says David Bank, MD, director at the Center for Dermatology, Cosmetic & Laser Surgery in Mt. Kisco, New York. Skin makes up about 16 percent of our body weight.

2. There are four main receptors in the skin that respond to pressure: Meissner’s corpuscles, Merkel’s discs, Ruffini endings, and Pacinian corpuscles. Each receptor responds to a different type of touch. “Meissner responds to light touch, Merkel to pressure and texture, Ruffini to stretching, and Pacinian to vibration and deep pressure,” Dr. Bank says. Additionally, there are countless free nerve endings in the skin that gauge pain and temperature.

3. Skin plays an important role in regulating body temperature. Your skin acts as your body’s thermostat. When temperatures rise, sweat glands activate to cool the body down. “Sweating is a bodily function that helps regulate your body temperature,” Bank says. “Normal sweating can be as much as a quart of fluid per day.” When temperatures are lower, blood vessels in the skin tighten and limit the amount of hot blood that can reach the skin, preventing heat loss. Pores also become smaller when exposed to colder temperatures in order to retain heat, Bank says.

4. Skin gets its color from a pigment called melanin. Skin color can range from very pale to very dark, depending on how much melanin the body makes. Everyone has the same amount of cells that produce melanin, which is made in the outer layer of the skin called the epidermis; but not everyone produces the same amount. The more melanin your body produces, the darker your skin.

5. Your skin regenerates itself. “Your skin sheds its dead skin cells on a daily basis, creating a new layer of skin every 28 days,” Bank says. “Even while you sleep, Mother Nature is doing her job by making sure your skin exfoliates itself, without your help.” That said, dead skin cells can remain on the skin, so it is important to remove them with an additional exfoliator.

How often you should exfoliate depends on your skin type. Bank recommends people with sensitive skin exfoliate once a week, while people with acne or combination or oily skin exfoliate twice a week. He recommends exfoliants with oatmeal, which has a soothing property to it; and he cautions against exfoliators with sharp or hard particles, such as apricot seeds or walnut shells, which can cause microscopic tears in the skin. “It’s best to gently massage scrub the exfoliant into wet skin for three minutes, then rinse with tepid water for the best results,” Bank says.

6. Dust is partly made up of dead skin cells. Dust is an accumulation of many materials, including dirt, animal dander, sand, insect waste, and even dead skin cells. “In fact, each time you vacuum, you’re picking up dead skin cells off the floor, the chair, and the walls,” Bank says.

7. Millions of bacteria live on the skin. “The skin’s surface is home to surprisingly diverse communities of bacteria, collectively known as the skin microbiota,” Banks says. “The harmless bacteria that thrive on the skin can help immune cells fight disease-causing microbes.”

8. Changes in the skin can reveal a lot about your health. Changes to the skin can be a sign that something is wrong. Rashes, hives, and itching may signal an allergic reaction, a bacterial skin infection, a viral infection, or an autoimmune disease. A mole may be a sign of skin cancer.

The American Academy of Dermatology recommends checking any moles for the ABCDEs of skin cancer: A = asymmetry, B = border (irregular or poorly defined), C = color (that varies from one area to another), D = diameter (greater than 6mm or the size of a pencil eraser), and E = evolving (a mole or lesion that changes in size, shape, or color). If you notice any of these warning signs, see a doctor.

9. Pimples are not caused by dirt or diet. These are common misconceptions, Bank says, but there are some common culprits that can offset breakouts. “Acne can be caused or aggravated by menstruation and/or pregnancy due to changes in hormone levels, sweating, humidity, some medications, and certain cosmetics or hair preparations,” he says.

To help treat and prevent acne, Bank recommends washing your face twice a day and after working out with a mild cleanser. Use noncomedogenic moisturizers and makeup products and oil-free sunscreens that do not clog pores, and be sure to wash facecloths and makeup pads and brushes regularly. You should remove all makeup before going to bed, and wash and change sheets and pillowcases every few days.

10. The sun does not make acne better. “Contrary to popular belief, sunbathing makes zits worse, not better,” Bank says. “The initial, temporary drying effect and the blemish-concealing tan may fool you, but UV rays actually stimulate oil production.” What’s more, the sun’s rays also thicken the outer layer of your skin, which blocks your pores and leads to breakouts.

Always practice sun safety by limiting time in the sun, especially between the hours of 10 am and 4 pm. Wear a hat and protective clothing, and choose a broad-spectrum sunscreen with an SPF of 30 or higher.

You can find this articles and other great articles on the EverydayHealth website here.

Care Credit

 

Want to schedule a service or procedure but can’t pay it all up front? Jolie Vie Aesthetics NOW OFFERS CARE CREDIT! This will allow our clients to pay off aesthetic services monthly and save the headache of paying all at once! Call (479) 715-6505 to get qualified and schedule your service!

You can go on the Care Credit website right here to apply and see us in the directory! We are located in Bentonville, Arkansas, but have patients from all over!

Thank you to Care Credit for providing such a great services and for working with us!